Top Tips for Working From Home

The COVID-19 pandemic saw businesses forced to close temporarily during lockdown. Fortunately, many professions were able to carry on working from home with the help of technology. The internet allowed many people to continue providing services to their customers and liaise with colleagues via online meetings. As lockdown eases, many people are continuing to work from home for one reason or another; parents are still awaiting for schools and childcare facilities to open fully, people may be still too anxious to return to the office and some businesses see the benefits of employees working from home and have not rushed employees back. Lots of people have enjoyed the chance to work from home; they valued the flexibility and the lack of traveling in rush hour. Many are asking whether office blocks are now things of the past. But as a society, if we do move to working from home more, employers will need to put policies, procedures and protocols in place to support those working from home. Linguation.com is an online translation agency offering translation in a vast number of language combinations and has translators experienced in policy writing. The translation agency can support firms get relevant home-working documentation in place for multilingual workforces to make sure everyone is clear of protocols and support available.  Whether you are an employer wanting to support your employees who are continuing to work from home or an employee working from home, read on for top tips for home-working.

Consider your work space

You should try to keep your work space separate from your living or sleeping space. This will not always be easy, particularly for younger people still living with parents, house-sharing or living in a studio apartment. However, as best you can, try to distinguish between where you work and where you relax. Many firms will do workstation checks in the workplace for those working with display screens to check that the desk height and chair are at their optimum, light is appropriate and without glare on the computer screen, foot stools are available if needed etc. These things are in place to support employees to ensure against pain and discomfort while working. You should try to arrange your own workstation at home in a similar way to minimize any work-related problems and speak to your employee about any issues.

Consider your environment for online meetings

It might seem unimportant, but consider what is behind you when taking part in an online meeting. Items or photos in the background might give away personal information about you or your family that you don’t want to share or would prefer to keep private. It is also good practice to check that there is nothing that might cause offence to another meeting participant, like bad language on a poster, for example. To avoid potential problems, you might like to consider using a virtual background. You should also dress appropriately. Depending on the nature of the meeting, t-shirt slogans may offend. Moreover, it is sensible to tell others in your house that you are about to be involved in an online meeting. The last thing you need is for teenage children to be arguing at the tops of their voices. Or if you are house-sharing, you don’t want your house mate to suddenly start playing music at top volume.

Know how to get support if required

Don’t expect to be able to do everything yourself and on your own. One downside of home-working could be the lack of team-working and team support. Don’t let this happen. Make sure you know who to contact with a work-related issue. You should not feel bad about seeking advice. In the office we can usually quickly get informal advice and support from a more experienced colleague. This will be more difficult working at home. Both peer and senior colleagues are usually more than happy to provide advice or a different perspective and is what good team work is all about. Try to maintain these informal and formal support networks while working at home.

Maintain a work life balance

Just because you are working from home does not mean you should be available 24/7. Arrange the hours that you will be available and stick to them. Being flexible is good but remember to maintain a work life balance otherwise you will not be effective. You need time to switch off and relax. Moreover, make sure you build in breaks during your working hours and time away from the computer or phone. Take time to eat away from your workstation, rather than eating while you work.

If you are looking to communicate safe and appropriate working practices with your staff working at home in their native tongue, Linguation.com will allocate an experienced native-speaking translator to your documents. More information about translation at Linguation.com may be found at: https://www.linguation.com/en/

Leave a Reply